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What do you Like?

Roll over wheel, the greatest invention in the history of mankind is now the Facebook's humble "Like" button. The creators of this button would never have thought that it would lead to such mind-boggling revenue and precious data generation for Facebook. Nor would they have thought that it would be used for anything else other than showing your approval for somebody's status message or link.

The Like button now encompasses all the colors of emotions; love, jealousy, anger, frustration; you name it. There are various websites urging you to "Like A Like" completely oblivious of Shakespeare turning in his grave on hearing this. The Like button enables you to deconstruct a person's entire psyche if you go through his/her likes. It has served as tool for flattery (in case of your boss) or impressing (a boy/girl). 

Some likes are philosophical - "I want my lyf 2 b a book so dat i can tear those pages whch i dnt want". Never mind the fact that no one would in their right mind would consider anything written in such SMS language to be serious. Nevertheless, an entire industry has spawned around these likes with people flocking there to pour their hearts out. In a sense, Facebook thrives on human misery, which is cool for any website to do!

Facebook's Like still has a long journey ahead with the clamor for a "Dislike" button. With Facebook setting up its shop in India, it seems India will now be seriously "liked" by Facebook.

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