Skip to main content

Why programmers need to have a sense of humor?

When I asked one of my friends for his comments about my last post, this is what he had to say -, "as an MBA i know hw imp ads are so i dont quite agree wit u" (reproduced verbatim from GMail Chat History). This was the same guy who had a great sense of humor when he was working as a programmer. He quit his job as a programmer and bam!, his sense of humor went away. Now this presents a burning question in front of us - why do all good programmers need to have an innate sense of humor?

It is an established fact that computers can become boring, especially to a programmer who keeps talking to it day after day without getting any response or appreciation. It never happens that you log in to your system and the computer chimes, "Hey Bro! Where have ya been? How 'bout a cuppa coffee before you begin?" If it happens, it means that it was written by a fellow developer who had his manager breathing down his neck to complete the project. Enjoying such greeting is like wearing a Blood Diamond! So to escape this dull, meaningless drudgery day in and day out, we programmers need to have a sense of humor.

The established notion of productivity in an IT company also contributes to programmers developing a funny bone. A developer, after working working very hard, reduces the running time of a program from 30 min to 30 seconds. Excitedly, he tells his manager about it. But the MBA-retarded manager only says, "Good. While you are here, can you point me to where I can find the mails I have kept for follow-up?" Its right there man. Just below the inbox, where it says "For Follow Up". What do you want? To dish it up in front of you complete with a 'Bon App├ętit' greeting! The only way one can hope to survive in such a environment is to see the funny side of it.

The HeadFirst Design Patterns book is a great example of humor in computers. So are blogs like The Daily WTF, or XKCD.

Finally a message to all the the programmers of the world aspiring to be a great one - learn to laugh. It will surely help you in avoiding the 'SenseOfHumorNotFoundException'. No kidding!

Comments

  1. While the Head First series of books are good, humorous reads, I found the one that you refer to, "head first Design Patterns" a bit too verbose and distracting. The examples stretched way too for the comfort of a technical book. Humor is fine, but not at the cost of trivializing technology.

    ReplyDelete
  2. If you want a serious book about design patterns, there are loads available in the market. Frankly, I don't find a serious technical book to be 'comforting'!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

As far as possible, please refrain from posting Anonymous comments. I would really love to know who is interested in my blog! Also check out the FAQs section for the comment policy followed on this site.

Popular posts from this blog

The IKEA Pilgrimage

"Hez!". If you were in Hyderabad for the opening of first IKEA store in India, you would be forgiven for thinking that it's a religious chant for followers of a religion who are trampling over themselves for getting into their place of worship. Except they were visitors to the new IKEA store.
For the past few days, the news had been carrying multitude of articles related to IKEA opening. The marketing by IKEA team only hyped the situation. Since I was looking to buy a bed, I made the unfortunate decision of going to the IKEA store for a quick in-n-out shopping with my wife on my way to office. The first red flag should have been when we couldn't get parking at 10 am in the morning of a weekday and were asked to park at one of external parking locations. The IKEA folks were kind enough to handout a map of the same.

We were asked to park near ITC Kohenur. From that location, like every well organized pilgrimage, there was a shuttle service to IKEA after every 30 minut…

Book Review - The Girl In Room 105

There are couple of reasons why I pre-ordered Chetan Bhagat's latest - its price is less than a cup of decent coffee making it an impulse purchase and more importantly the book's claim that it is an "unlove story", whatever that means. Bhagat had pioneered the trend of bubblegum IIT college love stories targeted at teens and college-going population which inspired a generation of wannabe writers. But you can chew bubblegum only for so long. After some time you have to spit it out. With this book Bhagat threw away the bubblegum only for it to stick to his shoes.
The story starts the same way as have Bhagat's previous books - in a college and more specifically in an IIT. For initial few chapters you would be forgiven if you think you have picked up one of Bhagat's previous works by mistake. Bhagat is still obsessed with fair skin, women's churidar kurta and how she arranges her hair. The English is still pedestrian which Bhagat justifies as this is how rea…

IoT on Google Cloud Platform

Google wants people to use its Cloud Platform for connecting and managing IoT devices through IoT Core and use other GCP components like BigQuery to analyze data produced by those devices. While these products are fantastic, they also have some real world challenges.
IoT Core provides a managed service for connecting IoT devices. It talks with both HTTP and MQTT protocols and features one-click integration with Cloud PubSub easing most of the infrastructure tasks. However there are some limitations:
You cannot use any random MQTT topic to send/receive messages as you would expect on a custom MQTT bridge. There are special topic formats to send messages and also to receive commands.IoT Core uses Public-Private Key cryptography to secure devices. All IoT devices must first authenticate using the Public Key in a JWT token and then start sending and receiving messages. While these may seem like reasonable restrictions, one has to keep in mind that hardware vendors are still stuck in the 9…