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Movie Review–Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Part 1)

Clearly the best movie of the Harry Potter series; it is also the most honest one. For once, the movie does not take “cinematic liberties” and make the original story a complete mess. It sets the tone of gloom and darkness from the first scene itself in which Hermione “obliviates” her parents. There is death and despair in the air as we miss the familiar surroundings of Hogwarts and the warmth of Dumbledore. Instead there is Nagini , writhing and hissing, as per Lord Voldemort’s will. Harry as the chosen one, Hermione and Ron take upon themselves the mission to find all the Horcruxes and destroy them and we follow their story as they continue on this dangerous mission.

Daniel Radcliffe (Harry) has clearly matured as an actor, as was also displayed in his play Equus. Rupert Grint (Ron) is at his funny best. The icing on the cake is the restrained yet powerful performance by Emma Watson (Hermione). Probably with Hogwarts out of the picture, it was easier for her to stop acting bookish. Smile She is amazing in scenes which show the mature side of her and also in the scenes dealing with sexuality. But the clear winner is the character of Dobby, the house-elf. His undying, devoted friendship and loyalty for Harry coupled his child-like enthusiasm makes him an infectious watch.

The movie has awe-inspiring action scenes, as with any Harry Potter movie. But for me, the most poignant scene was when Harry and Hermione dance to a song after Ron has left them alone in the jungle. It is not a dance of lovers but of friends. Kudos to the director who could pull this off, even while remaining truthful to the story which is filled with curses, death and blood.

Make no mistake, this is not the end. It merely sets the stage for the grand action that is supposed to follow in part 2. With a running time of nearly two and half hours, it surely matches the length of Sooraj Barjatiya’s marriage videos but when you are telling the story of “The Boy Who Lived”, we don’t mind it. I will go for 4.5 out of 5 stars for this movie. Go watch it. NOW!

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