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Nitish Kumar and the Miracle in Bihar


(This article borrows heavily from Harry Potter series of novels)

In a dark room of his Bombay (oops! Sorry, Mumbai) castle, Mr. Raj Thackeray was awakened from his sleep by the hooting of an owl. This owl was from his secretary who had sent him his schedule for today. He removed the scroll from the owl’s leg and looked at its contents.

10 AM – 12 PM – Give inflammatory speeches about how migrants are destroying Maharashtra to the poor and the uneducated.

12 PM – 1.30 PM – Lunch followed by attacks on hapless auto/taxi drivers.

1.30 PM – 3 PM – Encourage his dementors to attack media houses and claim it as spontaneous.

3 PM – 5 PM – Intimidate the reporter who dared question his methods in the course of an interview.

5 PM – 7 PM – Meet and threaten the director of the film who used the word Bombay in his movie.

“Another boring day”, he exclaimed. He poured himself a cup of tea and brought it to his lips when he happened to look at today’s newspaper. The ground beneath his feet shook. His hand trembled and the cup came crashing down on the floor. There it was staring him in the face - Bihar grew by 11.03%, next only to Gujarat.

He immediately summoned his fellow death-eaters and scheduled a meeting. “How could this happen?” he shouted. No one knew the answer. “If it helps sire, Bihar’s economy actually shrank by 5.15% in 2003-04. So if you take that into account, the growth rate is just around 8%”, someone tried to console him. This seemed to soften him a little. “And sire, there are economists questioning the validity of the data. They say that it is as farce as Railway’s growth under Lalu Prasad Yadav.” “OK, then find out the real data and let me know. Go!” he hissed.

Meanwhile in Bihar, Nitish Kumar twitched in his bed. The scar on his forehead was hurting again. Was Lalu Yadav close to getting the CM’s post again? Or was the data released by CSO (Central Statistical Organization) actually wrong?

We will have to just wait and watch.

Comments

  1. Well yes Nitish Kumar has done a lot of good for Bihar.and the figure you mentioned was not really surprising and it will continue to grow.guess Nitish should be given another 5 years to extend this growth.I hope Raj Thackray will learn a lesson from it!

    ReplyDelete
  2. @Ravi Nitish has really done some good work. He too is not a saint but he is definitely the lesser of the two evils. To cover up the 15 years of Lalu's rule in which we lagged behind, even at this growth rate it will take at least 10 years. Nitish should definitely be given a second term.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Sir,
    Request you to remove this asap. Otherwise we will do what we can.
    You understand what we can do correct.

    ReplyDelete
  4. @MNS Stop doing this Chandan sir. :)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Looks like Raj Thackray is not very happy with you ;) meanwhile nice you started following disclaimer in your blog.

    ReplyDelete

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